7 office adjustments to encourage healthy eating

Are you looking to eat healthier at work? These 7 simple tips can help you eat a healthy diet, without even trying.

 

1. Keep worktops clean and uncluttered.

Research has shown that messy worktops can actually lead to increased food consumption; people with cluttered kitchens tend to snack more. A chaotic environment also contributes to a chaotic mindset, so messy kitchens can lead to lack of control when snacking.

 

2. A fruit bowl is the one exception to the no clutter rule. 

Research has also found that people who keep fruit on display weigh less on average than those who don’t. The easier something is to get to, the more likely you are to go for it; if fruit is more readily available than junk food, you’re more likely to pick the healthy option.

 

3. Make sure your office water cooler is easily accessibly.

Like with fruit, the more accessible water is, the more likely you are to drink more. And drinking more water is a proven driver of weight loss, and general increased health.

 

4. Keep junk food hidden.

A study into cereal consumption found that women who had cereal on their counters weighed about 20 more pounds, on average, than those who stored it away. As the age old saying goes: out of sight, out of mind.

 

5. Eat off of smaller plates.

Eating from a smaller plate, around 10 inches in diameter, rather than the typical dinner plate (which can run up to 12 inches these days) also helps you manage your portions better, according to research. This is because the same portion of food will seem bigger on a smaller plate, so you’re less likely to overeat.

 

6. Don’t eat in front of your laptop or TV, or while you’re on your phone.

Numerous studies have shown that watching a screen or using technology while you eat might cause you to overeat without realising it.  The distraction takes your attention away from your food, potentially leading to mindless eating.

 

7. Eat at an actual table, if possible.

Research has found that people who eat the exact same foods sitting down or even standing at a standing table eat less overall throughout the day than those who don’t make table time. Eating at a table makes the eating experience feel more like an ‘actual’ meal, thus reducing snacking.

 

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